Posted by: hiddenlondon | August 22, 2013

Hidden London Gem: The William Morris Gallery

William Morris (1834 – 1896) has been hugely influential in the field of design and interior decoration, with his textile designs still massively popular on everything from wallpaper to shopping bags.  Whilst he worked primarily as a textile designer, his interests also spanned the arts, publishing, politics and conservation.

William Morris, design for Chrysanthemum wallpaper, 1877

William Morris, design for Chrysanthemum wallpaper, 1877

The William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow houses an impressive and significant collection, which includes printed, woven and embroidered fabrics, rugs, carpets, wallpapers, furniture, stained glass and painted tiles by Morris and his associates.

The gallery is housed in a Georgian building built in the 1740’s, and set in Lloyd Park. The grade II* listed building was Morris’s family home from 1848 to 1856 and this is the only public Gallery devoted to William Morris. It has recently undergone a major redevelopment and reopened in August 2012.

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The museum hosts various events and exhibitions.  The current exhibitions include he Art of Embroidery, until 22 September 2013, with new work by hand-embroidery specialist Nicola Jarvis, created in dialogue with the techniques and ideas championed by May Morris, William’s daughter.

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William Morris Gallery, Lloyd Park, Forest Road, Walthamstow, London, E17 4PP.

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Responses

  1. This is a smashing little museum, well worth a visit

    • Glad to hear you like it and thanks for the recommendation!


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